Mothers in Recovery: How To Put Your Recovery First

 

There’s no denying how difficult it can be for both mothers in recovery and those who are aiming to achieve sobriety.  Recovery is possible, even for you as a mother.  Though the idea of leaving your children and/or husband may sound difficult and maintaining a program of recovery can be overwhelming during motherhood, both will end up benefiting you and your family because you will actually be able to present for your loved ones.

Mothers in Recovery

Parenting is difficult alone but when combatting sobriety is thrown into the mix, it can become even more of a challenge.  Mothers in recovery certainly don’t have it easy to say the least, especially when you may not want to leave your children and/or husbands to go off into an alcohol and/or drug rehabilitation treatment center to recover.  Keep in mind that you wouldn’t be leaving your family permanently and that you are going away temporarily to get better.  If you had any other type of illness, you wouldn’t stay with your family and refuse treatment because you didn’t want to leave them; you would head right on over to recover so that you could get better as soon as possible and get back to being present with your family.

Time for recovery

An issue of concern for most mothers in recovery is finding the time to recover.  This is where mothers like you might stumble into misguided thinking; you should be making time for your recovery program.  The harsh reality is that anything an alcoholic and/or addict places before recovery will ultimately be lost.  Recovery HAS to come first!  This doesn’t mean you should neglect family responsibilities, but it does mean you should be making sure you are viewing treatment as the priority it is.  This means going to rehab, going to meetings, keeping in contact with a sponsor, and working on your program.  You could get connected with a specific Twelve-Step Fellowship meeting for mothers and/or parents so that you know its okay to bring your young children with you to the meeting, or if you have no other option, you may just have to bring your young children with you.  Another option could be trying to find care for your children during that specific meeting time during the week and make the commitment to attend that meeting regularly.  If your children are older and in school, then a great suggestion for you could be to attend meetings and handle recovery-related tasks during this duration when they are pre-occupied.

Reasons behind substance use explored

Mothers in recovery should be prepared to look at the reasons why they were resorting to drinking in the first place.  Drinking excessively and/or abusing other substances can be linked to having to combat major stressors.  For example, single mothers can face difficulties regularly if they struggle with finances, finding care for their children, and/or can’t provide as much as they would like.  Even mothers who are married with children still face challenges that might have led them to pick up drinking and/or abusing drugs, such as feeling overwhelmed with marital problems, house care, depression, anxiety, and/or work.  Having discussions with the family and/or professionals can help to alleviate some of this distress.

Whether you are struggling leaving for treatment or adjusting to your life as one of mothers in recovery and trying to find an adequate balance, motherhood may be tough but it’s worth it when you can experience it sober.

 

Read 3426 times Last modified on Tuesday, 20 October 2015 14:20
Rate this item
(1 Vote)

Leave a comment

Make sure you enter the (*) required information where indicated. HTML code is not allowed.